3D Printing Tools & Fixtures: Hacksaw
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3D Printing Tools & Fixtures: Hacksaw

3D printing tools and fixtures with a Markforged printer. This is a blog post about designing and reinforcing a hacksaw with continuous fiber.

Let’s “Cut to the chase” – the Markforged Mark Two 3D printer can print incredibly strong carbon fiber parts.  Whether it be for space applications, search and rescue, or simply a need for tools and fixtures, this lightweight, carbon fiber hacksaw is a testament to what can be accomplished on the Mark Two.

At Markforged we encourage our employees to create a 3D printed part on our printers every week.  This helps provide a deeper understanding of both our customer’s applications and overall needs.

Every Friday we take a break from work for Part of the Week where everyone showcases the parts they printed and we vote on which part we like the best.

Last Friday I showcased a fully functional carbon fiber hacksaw that I designed and printed on a Mark Two printer.

My goal for designing and 3D printing the hacksaw was to print a very strong, functional, lightweight cutting tool that can be used in numerous applications.

The hacksaw is reinforced with a carbon fiber zebra pattern to provide optimal rigidity for its intended use.  Unlike Kevlar, which provides some flexibility when in use, the carbon fiber is an ideal choice for this part and best meets this part’s strength requirements.

A fully functional hacksaw

A close-up of the carbon fiber zebra pattern filled hacksaw

Within Eiger, an option exists to allow for automatic reinforcement of your part. For 80% of our customers this is exactly what they are looking for. For some, there is a desire to have more flexibility in where the fiber reinforces the part and how the Mark Two lays down the continuous fiber strands.

Hacksaw part in Eiger.  The blue shows where the printer will lay down carbon fiber.

Within Eiger, an option exists to allow for automatic reinforcement of your part. For 80% of our customers this is exactly what they are looking for. For some, there is a desire to have more flexibility in where the fiber reinforces the part and how the Mark Two lays down the continuous fiber strands.

View of a single layer of concentric fiber strands.

For the hacksaw, continuous fiber stands were laid down in a concentric pattern.  Adding a group of isotropic layers to the midsection is planned for the next printing of this hacksaw.  The group of isotropic layers will help reduce any torsion that may be applied to the part when in use.

Want to print the hacksaw yourself? Download the STL file: Hacksaw

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Dan Topjian, Senior Application Engineer

Interested in learning more about Eiger and the Mark Two? Request a Demo today!

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